Since the original 10 amendments, or the Bill of Rights, 17 additional amendments have been passed. These include:

  • Thirteenth Amendment (Amendment XIII), ratified on December 6, 1865, which abolished slavery.
  • Fifteenth Amendment (Amendment XV), ratified on February 3, 1870, which states that "the right of the citizens…to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition or servitude." This amendment gave all men the right to vote, regardless of race, but it would be 50 years until women gained the right to vote, also known as suffrage.
  • Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX), ratified on August 8, 1920, which did much the same thing as Amendment XV, but was based on sex, thus giving women the right to vote: “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.”

Only one amendment, the Eighteenth Amendment (Amendment XVIII), ratified on January 6, 1919, prohibiting "the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors" was ever revoked; this was during a period of our nation’s history known as Prohibition when alcoholic consumption became illegal. The Twenty-third Amendment (Amendment XXI), ratified on December 5, 1933, was the amendment that repealed the Eighteenth Amendment (Amendment XVIII).