Assuming constitution is required, the following results were found.

  • U.S. Constitution Facts and Figures

    Constitutional Convention met at the State House in Philadelphia, PA, also known as Independence Hall. There were 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention, although only 39 signed the document. Twelve of the 13 states were represented; Rhode Island...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/j-constitution-facts
  • U.S. Constitution: 1789

    Constitution of the United States is the foundation of our American Government. It lays out the system of Government and the rights of the American people. The Constitution has three parts. The Preamble tells the purpose of the document and Government....

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/u-s-constitution-1789
  • U.S. Constitution: 1789

    Constitution of the United States is the foundation of our Federal Government. It is often called the supreme or highest law of the land; no law may be passed that contradicts its principles. At the same time, it is flexible and allows for changes in...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/j-us-constitution
  • Ways to Amend the Constitution

    Article V of the Constitution, there are two ways to propose and ratify amendments to the Constitution. To propose amendments, two-thirds of both houses of Congress can vote to propose an amendment, or two-thirds of the state legislatures can ask...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/j-ways-to-amend-constitution
  • U.S. Constitution Facts and Figures

    The Constitutional Convention met at the State House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, also known as Independence Hall. There were 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention; however, only 39 signed the document. Twelve of the thirteen states were...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/m-us-constitution-facts-figures
  • U.S. Constitution: 1787-1789

    Constitution of the United States is the foundation of our Federal Government. It is often called the supreme law of the land; no law may be passed that contradicts its principles. At the same time, it is flexible and allows for changes in the...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/m-constitution
  • Glossary

    for a bill that has been passed by one House of Congress. amend: To change the wording or meaning of a motion, bill, Constitution, etc. by formal procedure. For example, Congress may amend the Constitution. amendment: A proposal by a Member (in...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/glossary
  • States and Dates of Ratification

    September 17, 1787, the Constitution of the United States was finally accepted by the delegates. It did not contain any sort of Bill of Rights, even though that question had been heavily debated. Of the 42 delegates still present at the convention when...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/j-states-ratification
  • States and Dates of Ratification

    September 17, 1787, the Constitution of the United States was finally accepted by the delegates. It did not contain any sort of Bill of Rights, even though that question had been heavily debated. Of the 42 delegates still present at the convention when...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/54-age-14/master-historical-documents/master-u-s-constitution/169-states-and-dates-of-ratification
  • Oath of Office

    office; this is also known as a swearing-in ceremony. The official reciting the oath swears an allegiance to uphold the Constitution. The Constitution only specifies an oath of office for the President; however, Article VI of the Constitution states...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/j-oath-office
  • Ways to Amend the Constitution

    Article V of the Constitution, there are two ways to propose amendments to the Constitution and two ways to be ratified by the states. To propose amendments, two-thirds of both houses of Congress can vote to propose an amendment, or two-thirds of the...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/m-ways-to-amend
  • The Federalist Papers: 1787-1788

    after the end of the Constitutional Convention, a national debate began about whether or not to ratify the Constitution. Newspapers nationwide published essays both for and against ratification Those who supported ratification of the Constitution were...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/m-federalist-papers-1787-1788
  • The Constitutional Convention

    convention of delegates from all the states (except Rhode Island) met in Philadelphia, PA, in May of 1787. Known as the Constitutional Convention, during this meeting it was decided that the best solution to the young country's problems was to set aside...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/j-constitutional-convention
  • Additional Amendments to the Constitution

    Since the original 10 amendments, or the Bill of Rights, 17 additional amendments have been passed. These include: Thirteenth Amendment (Amendment XIII), ratified on December 6, 1865, which abolished slavery. Fifteenth Amendment (Amendment XV), ratified...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/55-age-14/master-historical-documents/master-bill-of-rights/173-additional-amendments-to-the-constitution
  • Additional Amendments to the Constitution

    Since the original 10 amendments, or the Bill of Rights, 17 more amendments have been passed. These include: Amendment XIII , ratified on December 6, 1865, which abolished slavery. Amendment XV , ratified on February 3, 1870, which states that "the...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/48-age-9/journeyman-historical-documents/journeyman-bill-of-rights/141-additional-amendments-to-the-constitution
  • The Judicial Branch

    III of the Constitution establishes the judicial branch of Government with the creation of the Supreme Court. Section 1 of Article III begins: The judicial Power of the United States shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/m-judicial
  • The Constitutional Convention

    of delegates from all the states except Rhode Island met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in May of 1787. Known as the Constitutional Convention, at this meeting it was decided that the best solution to the young country's problems was to set aside the...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/m-constitutional-convention
  • From Colonial Rule to Independence

    first steps toward creating a new system of government. Before the American Revolutionary War, each state had its own constitution, which gave people certain rights, such as freedom of speech, religion, and the press. During the war, the 13 colonies...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/j-colonial-rule-to-independence
  • Bill of Rights: 1789-91

    When the Constitution was ratified in 1789, people were concerned that it did not protect some basic rights. They thought that the Constitution should be changed to protect these rights. On December 15, 1791, 10 amendments were officially added to the...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/m-bill-of-rights
  • Bill of Rights: 1789-91

    the Constitution was ratified in 1789, people were concerned that it did not protect some basic rights. They thought that the Constitution should be changed to protect these rights. On December 15, 1791, 10 amendments were officially added to the...

    https://bensguide.gpo.gov/j-bill-rights-1789-91

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